Breaking But Not Entering

Someone tried to break into our house a couple of weeks ago. He or she pried the screen out of the
frame and began to try to remove the glass pane out of the window in a
bedroom faced away from the street.  Although
our alarm system would have eventually triggered, and for
whatever reason they stopped trying to get in, it is the creepiest
feeling to know that someone has tried break in. This, of course, comes
on the heels of someone using my credit card numbers last month. Are
the two incidents related? I don’t know. But it makes things even
creepier.

In response, we have added another security camera, this one scanning the entire backyard,
including the window in question. It is now hooked up to my multi-media
PC where any movement is recorded to the hard drive.

In this day, where illegal drug use seems to be so wide spread, it is difficult not to be affected. Our
neighbors on either side and across the street from us have all been
broken in to over the last two years. The thing of it is, is that
thieves used to be concerned with only taking things. Now, they try to
steal your personal identity so that they can make even more money –
either by selling it to brokers or by using it themselves to buy stuff
that they can later sell.

It may have become so easy to steal a person’s identity for, what would seem at first, strange
reasons.  First, on one hand, the victim is not financially
responsible once having notified the proper authorities (the
financial institutions and the police, etc.).  So, on this
front, there is no reason for people to complain to their
legislatures/police to demand action. On the other hand, these same
institutions do little if anything themselves to track down and
prosecute the thieves. It seems that the cost is considered part of doing
business and they essentially write it off.

How do I know this? Well, look at the laws, if any, in your state regarding identity theft. Only
recently has it begun to sink in that this is a very serious and
growing problem. But even when it gets to the front of the line, it is
not taken seriously by many legislatures and yes, even some judges.
Hence, why should credit card companies spend time and money on
tracking down these people?

That said, once you are the victim of such a crime, you may never be made whole again. You may have
to monitor your credit until the day you die (and your family will need
to continue to do so after your passing). There aren’t too many crimes
like this and those that are similar are, I think, treated much more
seriously. Pray your identity is never stolen. YMMV. Insert disclaimer
here.

Aloha!

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One response to “Breaking But Not Entering

  1. Some identity theft cases are intended to make a quick money grab or commit a one-off crime. Most are done to be used for covering tracks after a crime. A bit like thieves stealing a car to get away and drop it off a few blocks away to steal another car etc.
    So even if they investigate they are very likely to hit dead-ends. It costs lots of money that they probably cannot recover.